Home Areas of Focus Intercountry Adoption Country Updates

Country Updates

Attention: open in a new window. PDF 


Bhutan

Status

Bhutan is currently CLOSED to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Coming soon

 

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


CAMBODIA

Status

Cambodia is currently CLOSED to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Cambodia is a party to the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption, but it has not yet established the necessary infrastructure and authorities to come into compliance with the Convention. In, March of 2012, the Cambodian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation announced plans to delay the date that it will begin accepting new adoption petitions until January 2013.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


CHINA

Status

China is currently OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Adoption from China is governed by the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption. In order to adopt from China, prospective parents must meet the qualifications for adopting as determined by both the Chinese and U.S. governments.  The length of time required to adopt a child from China varies depending on the type of adoption.  Despite increased restrictions on adoptive parents and longer wait times, China remains one of the top sending countries for American families adopting internationally.  Its Waiting Child Program, which promotes and facilitates adoptions for children with special needs, has enjoyed particular success in recent years.

  • Alert: Suspension of Adoption Immigration Visa Interviews
    U.S. Department of State May 15, 2013

    The Tianyu office of the U.S. Consulate in Guangzhou, including the Adopted Children’s Immigrant Visa Unit (ACIVU), was closed on May 14 and will remain closed through May 17.  The Consulate General staff will contact affected families as soon as possible to provide updated information regarding rescheduling interviews, or returning passports with visas for applicants who have already been interviewed.  Please email the Consulate General at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it with the following information:
           1. Full Name of adopting parent(s)
           2. Adopted child’s name
           3. Email address of family
           4. Name and email address of facilitator
           5. Hotel name and phone number (if applicable) 

    You many also check Guangzhou U.S. Embassy Website or adoption.state.gov for updates to the Consulate General’s status of opera­tions.
  • China Adoption Notice
    U.S. Department of State April 26, 2010
  • Click here to read Adoption Advocate No. 18 "State of Adoption from China."
  • Click here to see our 'Hague Process for China Page'
  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with Chinese adoption programs.
  • For more information, click here to visit the Department of State's China information page.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


COLOMBIA

Status

Columbia is OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Colombia is a member of the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption, and all Colombian adoptions must go through the Family Welfare Institute (ICBF), Colombia's Central Authority.  The ICBF does not allow an adopted child to travel to the United States until the adoption has been finalized before a family judge in Colombia, with adoptive parents present.

  • Columbia Adoption Notice: Columbia's revised procedures for determining children's eligibility for intercountry adoption
    U.S. Department of State October 22, 2012

    Colombia's Institute for Family Welfare (ICBF) recently announced revised procedures for determining a child’s eligibility for intercountry adoption, which may affect some adoptions involving U.S. families. This process is known in Colombia as the “re-establishment of rights.” ICBF implemented these new procedures as a result of a November 2011 Constitutional Court ruling that ICBF was not fully considering the rights of, and opportunities for placement with, biological and extended families before placing a child for domestic or intercountry adoption.

    To comply with the Constitutional Court decision, ICBF has been reviewing approximately 1,300 declarations of adoptability to ensure they meet the revised procedures. ICBF has identified a number of cases in which the adoption eligibility determination for a child does not meet the new standards. ICBF has placed an administrative hold on these cases until it is satisfied that the adoptability determination is evaluated as to whether there might be an extended family member who could care for the child. ICBF will notify prospective adoptive families that have been matched with children whose cases require evaluation. For privacy reasons, ICBF cannot inform the prospective adoptive families of the specific reasons for the review, and ICBF cannot offer any guarantee of the final outcome of the review.

    As of September 2012, the U.S. Embassy in Bogota is aware of six instances involving U.S. families whose adoption proceedings required review; one adoption has since been finalized. These reviews represent a small percentage of the total number of intercountry adoptions between Colombia and the United States, and the Embassy continues to work with ICBF to encourage timely resolution. Families who learn that their adoption has been placed on hold should inform the U.S. Embassy in Bogota by contacting This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

    In addition to these formal reviews, both ICBF and the Colombian family court system appear to be scrutinizing proposed adoptions more carefully. Prospective adoptive families may experience delays while ICBF evaluates a family’s suitability before finalizing the match with an available child. The issuance of the adoption decree by a family court judge may also take longer than in the past. Families should anticipate spending six to eight weeks in Colombia to obtain the final adoption decree. Given these delays, the Embassy strongly advises all families with less than three months’ validity left on USCIS fingerprint results to make arrangements with USCIS ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) to update these before traveling to Colombia to complete the adoption.

    The Department of State will provide updated information on adoption.state.gov as it becomes available. If you have any questions about this notice, please contact the Office of Children’s Issues at 1-888-407-4747 within the United States, or 202-501-4444 from outside the United States. E-mail inquiries may be directed to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .
  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with Colombian adoption programs.
  • For more information, click here to visit the Department of State's Colombia adoption information page.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


CONGO (DRC)

Status

The Democratic Republic of Congo is OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

The Democratic Republic of Congo is not subject to the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption. American families wishing to adopt must meet all requirements of both the DRC and the U.S. Prospective adoptive parents can be matched with a child through their adoption agency or travel to an orphanage to select their child. While the Ministry of Justice has jurisdiction over adoption, regional tribunals are responsible for the cases. Adoptive parents must be present at a court hearing, but are not required to remain in DRC while a judgement is being considered. If the adoption is approved, the date of adoption is retroactive to the date of the original court hearing.

  • Alert: Democratic Republic of the Congo Immigration Authorities Suspend Issuance of Exit Permits to Adoptees
    U.S. Deparmtnet of State September 27, 2013

    On September 27, the Congolese Ministry of Interior and Security, General Direction of Migration (Direction Generale d’Immigration, DGM) informed the U.S. Embassy in Kinshasa that effective September 25, 2013, the DGM suspended issuance of exit permits to adopted Congolese children seeking to depart the country with their adoptive parents. The DGM reports the suspension will last up to 12 months.
    This suspension is due to concerns over reports that children adopted from the Democratic Republic of the Congo may be either abused by adoptive families or adopted by a second set of parents once in their receiving countries.

    The suspension of exit permits for adopted Congolese children applies to all intercountry adoptions and is not limited to adoptions by U.S. citizens. These exit permits are required in addition to U.S. immigrant visas in order for children to travel to the United States.    

    The DGM has not indicated whether adoptions in process may continue during the suspension period.  The U.S. Embassy in Kinshasa is seeking clarification on the impact this will have on cases where adoptions were already completed, or completed and an immigrant visa issued.  We will post new information as it becomes available on www.adoption.state.gov.

    Please direct questions related to this alert or a specific adoption from the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the Department of State, Office of Children’s Issues to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

  • Alert: Democratic Republic of the Congo Immigration Authorities Resume Limited Issuance of Exit Permits to Children Adopted in Tribunal pour Enfants 
    U.S. Department of State June 28, 2013

    This alert updates the Department of State's May 2 adoption alert regarding the suspension of issuance of exit permits to adopted Congolese children seeking to depart the country with their adoptive parents.

    On June 17, the Democratic Republic of the Congo's (DRC) General Directorate of Migration (Direction Generale de Migration, DGM) informed the U.S. Embassy in Kinshasa that the DGM has partially lifted its temporary suspension of issuance of exit permits to adopted Congolese children seeking to depart the country with their adoptive parents. At this time, DGM will only issue permits to children whose adoptions were completed in the local Tribunal pour Enfants, in accordance with the Congolese 2009 law regarding the protection of children.

    The U.S. Embassy in Kinshasa is seeking further clarification on the DGM's decision and how it may affect intercountry adoptions completed in the Tribunal de Paix in provinces where a Tribunal pour Enfants does not yet exist or did not exist at the time an adoption was completed. The Department of State will post new information as it becomes available on adoption.state.gov.

    Prospective adoptive parents seeking to adopt from the DRC and their adoption service providers are encouraged to review the information provided by the Department of State regarding the current Embassy procedures, the general process for adopting from the DRC, and the  most recent travel warning.

    If you have concerns or questions regarding the alert or a specific adoption from the DRC, please contact the Department of State, Office of Children's Issues at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


  • Alert: Democratic Republic of the Congo Immigration Authorities Suspend Issuance of Exit Permits to Adoptees
    U.S. Department of State May 2, 2013

    On April 29, the Congolese Ministry of Interior and Security, General Direction of Migration (DGM) informed the U.S. Embassy in Kinshasa that the DGM has temporarily suspended issuance of exit permits to adopted Congolese children seeking to depart with their adoptive parents. This suspension is due to an ongoing investigation of an adoption that may not have complied with Congolese law. 

    The suspension of exit permits for adopted Congolese children applies to all intercountry adoptions and is not limited to adoptions by U.S. citizens. These exit permits are required in addition to U.S. immigrant visas in order for children to travel to the Untied States. 

    The DGM does not expect to issue exit permits to any adoptees during the investigation. New information will be posted as it becomes available on adoption.state.gov.

  • DRC Adoption Notice: Reports of the removal of Children from Orphanages in the DRC
    U.S. Department of State March 15, 2013

    The U.S. Department of State recently received several reports that children adopted in the Democratic Republic of Congo have reportedly been taken from orphanages by a birth parent or relative after adoption decree and certificate of non-appeal was issued by Congolese courts. This information reportedly has been presented to adoptive families by their agencies either following the Form I-600 petition approval, or immediately prior to filing the Form I-600 petition.

    While there is a specific legal procedure through the Congolese courts for a biological parent or relative to reclaim an abandoned or relinquished child prior to any adoption judgments, once a certificate of non-appeal is issued, the adoption judgment can generally no longer be the subject of appeal or objection. Congolese courts are able to dissolve an adoption at the request of the adoptee or the adoptive parent in exceptional circumstances, but only through appropriate legal processes. Adoptive parents who have already received adoption decrees and certificates of non-appeal, but learn that their child was removed from an orphanage by a birth parent or relative, may wish to seek independent legal counsel in the Democratic Republic of the Congo to learn their legal rights as the adoptive parents under Congolese law.

    The U.S. Embassy in Kinshasa maintains a list of attorneys who have identified themselves as willing to assist U.S. citizen clients. Placement on this list does not constitute endorsement or assessment of an individual attorney's qualifications by the U.S. Embassy in Kinshasa or the U.S. Department of State.

    If you have concerns, questions, or information regarding this issue, please contact the U.S. Department of State, Office of Children's Issues at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


COSTA RICA

Status

Costa Rica is currently OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Costa Rica is a member of the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption.  Its Central Authority, the Patronato Nacional de la Infancia (PANI), prohibits the adoption of children under the age of five, unless the child is part of a sibling group or has disabilities that could make placement difficult.  Costa Rica requires adoptive parents to send post-adoption reports for two years following the adoption, at six-month intervals.

  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with Costa Rican adoption programs.
  • For more information, click here to visit the Department of State's Costa Rica adoption information page.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


ETHIOPIA

Status

Ethiopia is currently OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Ethiopia is not a Hague Convention Member State. American parents adopting from Ethiopia must follow all procedures and meet all requirements outlined by both the Ethiopian and U.S. governments. Currently, a U.S. consular officer must conduct an investigation (I-604) to verify a child's orphan status before he or she can immigrate to the U.S., and this investigation may take several months to complete. Adoptive parents should be sure to verify the status of their case before traveling to Ethiopia.

    • Ethiopia Adoption Notice 
      U.S. Department of State September 3, 2013

      This adoption notice serves as a reminder of the implentation of the Pre-Adoption Immigration Review (PAIR) program in Ethiopia. This notice also provides clarification to questions received regarding transition cases. 

      On June 3, the Department of State published an adoption notice announcing that effective September 1, 2013, the Government of Ethiopida will require all adoption cases filed on behalf of U.S. prospective adoptive parents with the Ethiopian courts to undergo the U.S. PAIR process. Please see the U.S. Department of State's Ethiopia country information sheet and the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) policy memorandum for details. 

      Ethiopia's Ministry of Women, Children and Youth Affairs (MOWCYA) confirmed to the U.S. Embassy in Addis Ababa that 70 cases with open applications were still pending with the Federal First Instance Court (FFIC) as of the annual court closure on Augsut 14 will be treated as pre-PAIR cases and not be subject to the PAIR requirement, even if they are completed after September 1. These are cases where: 

      the first court hearing took place prior to the August 14 court closure and the prospective adoptive parents are wait¬ing for the second court hearing to be scheduled, or have received court dates for October. No PAIR letter will be required for these cases.

      the prospective adoptive parents have received and accepted referrals and filed applications with the court prior to the August 14 closure date, but are waiting for first and second hearings to be scheduled. No PAIR letter will be required for these cases.

      the court filing was accepted by FFIC administrative staff during the court recess following the August 14 closure but before the September 1, 2013 implementation date for the PAIR program. No PAIR letter will be required for these cases.

      If you have further questions as to whether your case falls into these categories, please contact the Office of Children’s Issues at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .
    • Ethiopia Adoption Notice: Summary of Adoption Service Provider Meeting with the U.S. Embassy
      U.S. Department of State May 10, 2012

    • Ethiopia Adoption Notice: Confirmation of Orphanage Closures in Ethiopia
      U.S. Department of State October 17, 2011
      • SOS Infants Ethiopia (Arbaminch, Dila and Awassa branches)
      • Gelgella Integrated Orphans (Tercha and Durame branches)
      • Bethzatha Children’s Home Association (Sodo, Hosaena, Dila, Haidya, Durame, and Hawassa branches)
      • Ethio Vision Development and Charities (Dila and Hawassa branches)
      • Special Mission for Community Based Development (Hosaina branch)
      • Enat Alem Orphanage (Awassa branch)
      • Initiative Ethiopia Child and Family Support (Hawassa branch)
      • Resurrection Orphanage (Hosaina branch)
      • Musie Children’s Home Association (Hadiya, Hosaina, Dila, and Kenbata branches)
      • Organization for Gold Age (Kucha, Dila, Hawassa branches)
      • Hidota Children’s Home Association (Soto branch)
      • Biruh Alem Lehisanat, Lenatochina Aregawiyan (Hosaina branch)

Ethiopian government officials confirmed the closure of several orphanages in the Southern Nations state due to revocation of the orphanages’ operational licenses.  Each orphanage in Ethiopia receives an operational license that the Charities and Societies Administration administers and monitors to ensure compliance with Ethiopian regulations. This is an update to the previous Adoption Notice posted on August 3, 2011. These orphanages are:

According to officials in the Charities and Societies Agency office, which oversees the licensing and regulation of orphanages in Ethiopia, the children in the care of those facilities have already been transferred to other orphanages.

Ethiopian officials indicate that cases involving orphaned children from these facilities which are already pending with the Federal First Instance court will continue to move forward.  The Embassy in Addis Ababa is working closely with Ethiopian officials to determine if children from these facilities who had been previously referred for matches will be allowed to continue in the adoption process.  Regional officials have confirmed that the affected children’s case files are currently being reviewed on a case by case basis by regional Ministry of Women’s Affairs offices.

We continue to ask prospective adoptive parents and agencies that are hearing news of specific closures to inform the Department.  Please send any specific information regarding orphanage closures to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it with the subject line “Ethiopia Orphanage Closures.”

Prospective and adoptive parents are encouraged to remain in contact with their adoption service provider to stay up-to-date on any information pertinent to their individual case.  The Department will post any confirmation on www.adoption.state.gov as we receive it.

  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with Ethiopian adoption programs.
  • For more information, click here to visit the Department of State's Ethiopia adoption information page.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


GHANA

Status

Ghana is currently SUSPENDED to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Ghana is not a member of the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption.  Prospective adoptive parents are required to live in Ghana for at least three months prior to adopting a child, although this requirement may be waived at the recommendation of the Ministry of Social Welfare on a case-by-case basis. Single citizens of Ghana may adopt a child; foreigners must be married in order to adopt. While adoption from Ghana is currently open, as of April 2010 procedural changes in the documentation required to ado[t from Ghana were established that may increase the in-process time.

  • Alert: All Adoption Casses with the Ghanaian Department of Social Welfare are Subject to Suspension
    U.S. Department of State May 20, 2013

    The Government of Ghana has temporarily suspended processing of all adoption cases, including intercountry adoptions, pending Ghana's review of its current adoption procedures. All adoption cases which have not received final approval by Ghanaian Department of Social Welfare are subject to this suspension.

    At this time, adoption cases which have completed processing with the Ghanaian Department of Social Welfare, and are either before a Ghanaian court or have a completed adoption order, are unaffected by the suspension. Urgent or emergency cases subject to the suspension can be referred directly to the Ghanaian Director of Social Welfare in Accra for consideration.

    The Department of State will continue providing updated information on adoption.state.gov as it becomes available. if you have any questions about this notice, please contact the Office of Children's Issues at 1-888-407-4747 within the United States, or 202-501-4444 from outside the United States. Email inquires may be directed to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

  • Alert: Government of Ghana Suspends Intercountry Adoptions
    U.S. Department of State May 14, 2013

    The Government of Ghana has temporarily suspended processing of all adoption cases, including intercountry adoptions, pending Ghana’s review of its current adoption procedures. The U.S. Embassy in Accra is seeking further clarification of the scope and dura­tion of this temporary suspension by the Government of Ghana and how this suspension may effect pending adoptions. The U.S. Em­bassy will continue processing adoption cases already approved by Ghanaian authorities.

    The Department of State will continue providing updated information on adoption.state.gov as it becomes available. If you have any questions about this notice, please contact the Office of Children's Issues at 1-888-407-4747 within the United States, or 202-501-4444 from outside the United States. Email inquires may be directed to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .
  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with Ghana adoption programs.
  • For more information, click here to visit the Department of State's Ghana adoption information page.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

 


GUATEMALA

Status

Guatemala is currently CLOSED to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Guatelmala is a member of the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption, but has thus far failed to comply with the Convention's regulations.  There is no indication if or when Guatemala will be able to establish a Hague-compliant intercountry adoption program.  At this time, both the U.S. Department of State and adoption advocacy organizations in the U.S. strongly discourage prospective adoptive parents from pursuing intercountry adoption fron Guatemala.

  • Guatemala Adoption Notice: Guatemala Update
    U.S. Department of State May 14, 2012
  • U.S. Department of State, Office of Children's Issues, Adoptions Division announced a Teleconference on Guatemala Adoptions to be held on Thursday, March 31, 2011.   The U.S. Department of State Office of Children’s Issues Adoptions Division would like to invite prospective adoptive parents, adoption service providers, and adoption stakeholders with an interest in Guatemala adoptions to a teleconference with the Office of Children’s issues and the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to discuss the status of intercountry adoption processing in Guatemala.

    The focus of the call will be primarily to provide an updated outlook for resolution of the remaining “grandfathered” adoption cases involving U.S. citizens. This update will include information from a recent trip to Guatemala during which USCIS and the Office of Children’s Issues met with Guatemalan government officials for updates on the status of “grandfathered” adoption cases still pending in Guatemala.

    Please join us for this call to learn more about adoption processing in Guatemala. If you are calling from within the United States, please dial: 1-888-363-4749.  If you are calling from outside the United States, please dial: 1-215-446-3662.  The passcode for the callers is 6276702.  
  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with Guatemala adoption programs.
  • For more information, click here to visit the Department of State's Guatemala adoption information page.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

 


HAITI

Status

Haiti is currently CLOSED to new adoptions.

Summary

Since the devastating earthquake in January 2010, it has been impossible for authorities to legally process adoptions from Haiti; the focus of both Haitian officials and the international community is quite rightly on securing medical and humanitarian aid and ensuring the safety of the people of Haiti.  Many children in Haiti have been separated from their parents or left orphaned, and every effort must be made to reunite them with caregivers or family members in Haiti.  It is not yet known when adoptions that were already in process prior to the crisis will be able to be finalized, or when new referrals for adoptions from Haiti will be made.

  • Haitian Adoption Notice:  Haitian Child Paroled Under Special Circumstances
    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services July 2, 2010
  • Haitian Adoption Notice:  Information Regarding Haitian Orphans Paroled After January 12, 2010
    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services July 2, 2010
  • Click here to join NCFA's Heart to Haiti Information Network and receive the latest Haiti adoption news and updates.
  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with Haitian adoption programs.
  • For more information, click here to visit the Department of State's Haiti adoption information page.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


HONDURAS

Status

Honduras is currently OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

The adoption process in Honduras is currently in flux. Policies regarding eligibility requirements for prospective adoptive parents, residency requirements, and time frame are under review by the Honduran Family Court (IHNFA). Any change on the family code regarding all the above must be done by the Congress, not the family court, they can only give their opinion. This has been under review for more than 8 years, they have been studying many law projects, and however, it remains the same.

Honduras is not a member of the Hague Convention.  All adoptions from Honduras must meet the requirements of the U.S. and Honduran governments, and are subject to approval by the Instituto Hondureño de la Niñez y la Familia (IHNFA) and the Honduran Family Court. 

  • Honduras Adoption Notice: The Honduran Adoption Authority Instituto Hondureno de la Ninez y la Familia (IHNFA), has Resumed Normal Operations
    U.S. Department of State October 25, 2012

    This alert updates the alert published on October 17, 2012 regarding the temporary closure of the Instituo Hondureno de la Ninez y Familia (IHNFA), due to labor strike. U.S. Embassy Tegucigalpa confirmed that as of Friday, October 19, 2012, the strike ended and IHNFA is operating normally. Prospective adoptive parents with cases currently pending with IHNFA are encouraged to seek updates on their cases from their adoption service provider.
  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with Honduras adoption programs.
  • For more information, visit the Department of State’s Honduras adoption information page.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website.

Back to Top


INDIA

Status

India is currently OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

India is a member of the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption, and all adoptions from India must meet the requirements of the Hague Convention and U.S. law governing adoption.  All intercountry adoptions in India are processed at the U.S. Embassy in New Delhi.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


JAMAICA

Status

Jamaica is currently OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Jamaica is not a member of the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption, and all adoptions must meet the requirements of both U.S. and Jamaican adoption officials.  The Jamaican adoption authority is the Child Development Agency (CDA).  An adoption in Jamaica may be processed as either an Adoption License (allowing a Jamaican child to be taken to a "scheduled country"--such as the U.S.--and adopted there) or an Adoption Order (finalizing the adoption in Jamaica).  The latter takes the legal place of a birth certificate, and includes the child's date of birth, his or her new parent(s), and his or her new name.  Prospective adoptive parents should plan on at least two visits to Jamaica before bringing their child home, though there are no in-country establishment of residency requirements.

  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with Jamaican adoption programs.
  • For more information, click here to visit the Department of State's Jamaica adoption information page.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website


JAPAN

Status

Japan is currently OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Japan is not a member of the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption. Therefore, when the Hague Adoption Convention entered into force for the United States on April 1, 2008, intercountry adoption processing for Japan did not change for American citizens.  American citizens can complete a full and final adoption in Japan under Japanese law. However, since Japanese law requires the adopting parents and the child to spend at least six months together before the adoption can be finalized, this option is generally only feasible for American citizens who are already resident in Japan.  American citizens may obtain legal custody of the child in Japan for the purposes of the child's emigration and a full and final adoption in the United States.  To bring an adopted child to United States from Japan, you must be found eligible to adopt by the U.S. Government. The U.S. Government agency responsible for making this determination is the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

 

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


KAZAKHSTAN

Status

Kazakhstan is SUSPENDED  to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Coming Soon

  • Kazakhstan Adoption Notice: Kazakhstan Suspends Intercountry Adoptions
    U.S. Department of State August 21, 2012

    The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Kazakhstan informed the U.S. Embassy in Astana on August 9 that Kazakhstan is suspending intercountry adoptions to the United States, effective immediately. Ambassador Susan Jacobs, Special Advisor for Children's Issues, met with government officials in Kazakhstan on Auust 16 to address the Ministry's concerns. The Ministry clarified that the suspension involves a pause in adoption referrals, but does not affect Kazakhstan's ongoing process to authorize U.S. adoption service providers. The Department of State is continuing discussions with Kazakhstan as a Hague Adoption Convention partner, and will provide updated information on adoption.state.gov as it becomes available.
  • Kazakhstan Adoption Notice: Adoptions from Kazakhstan to Begin With Approval of U.U. ASPs
    U.S. Department of State May 10, 2012

    The Ministry of Education and Science, the Central Authority of Kazakhstan, has confirmed approval of two U.S. accredited adoption service providers (ASPs) to process Hague Convention adoptions from Kazakhstan to the United States.

    The ASPs are: Little Miracles and Across the World Adoptions.

    Approval of ASPs was the final step needed for Kazakhstan to complete its implementation of the Hague Adoption Convention. Each of the U.S. ASPs approved by the Government of Kazakhstan may begin accepting applications for adoptions under the new procedures on its date of authorization.

    The U.S. Department of State is pleased to have the opportunity to work with Kazakhstan as a Hague Convention partner and to complete Convention intercountry adoptions of eligible children from Kazakhstan by qualified adoptive parents in the United States.
  • Kazakhstan Approval of New Hague Convention Adoption Process
    U.S. Department of State April 5, 2012

    The Ministry of Education and Science, the Central Authority of Kazakhstan, has confirmed that the government decree approving its new policies to process intercountry adoptions and accredit adoption agencies in Kazakhstan goes into effect on Thursday, April 5, 2012.

    The Government of Kazakhstan will begin accepting applications for accreditation from potential adoption service providers on April 9, 2012, on a first-come, first served basis.

    Information on the new accreditation process and the new adoption procedures will be available on the Central Authority's website shortly.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


KENYA

Status

Kenya is OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Coming Soon

  • Kenya Adoption Notice from the U.S. Department of State October 15, 2013: Reminder of Kenyan Prohibition Against Pre-Selection of Prospective Adoptees -The Kenyan Adoption Committee has requested that the United States government remind adoption service providers and prospective adoptive parents of Kenya’s strict prohibition against pre-selection of children by prospective adoptive parents. The Kenyan National Adoption Committee, Kenya’s Central Authority under the Hague Adoption Convention, is likely to reject dossiers and/or referrals for families that have pre-selected a child or have had prior contact of any kind with a specific child, the child’s guardian, or individuals with power to determine a child’s eligibility or placement for adoption. This could include, but would not be limited to, contact through mission trips, volunteering at orphanages, or other relationships with the prospective adoptee. The sole exception to this prohibition is when a prospective adoptive parent can prove a blood relationship with a prospective adoptee.

    The U.S. Intercountry Adoption Act, which implements the Hague Adoption Convention in the United States, and the Department of Homeland Security’s Interim Hague regulations require disclosure in the home study of any information relevant to the prospective adoptive parents’ eligibility to adopt under the specific requirements of the child’s country of origin (See 8 CFR 204.311(q)). Prior contact between prospective adoptive parents or any additional adult member of the household and a Kenyan child’s parents, custodian or other individuals or entity responsible for the child’s care may be grounds for denial of the Form I-800 (See 8 CFR 204.309(b)(2)).

    Adoption service providers and prospective adoptive parents who wish to know more about intercountry adoptions from Kenya can visit the Department of State’s page on adopting from Kenya and the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi’s website for more information. 

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


KOREA

Status

Korea is currently OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

The Republic of Korea, aka South Korea, is not a member of the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption.  All intercountry adoptions from Korea must go through a licensed adoption agency that has been recognized and approved by the Korean Ministry for Health, Welfare and Family Affairs.  Korea, which has a thriving domestic infant adoption program, has announced that it plans to end its intercountry adoption program by 2012, and in preparation for this is decreasing the number of overseas adoptions every year.

  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with Korean adoption programs.
  • For more information, click here to visit the Department of State's Korea adoption information page.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


KYRGYZSTAN

Status

Kyrgyzstan is currently CLOSED* to intercountry adoption.

Summary

According to a statement by the U.S. Department of State, the Kyrgyz government halted all intercountry adoptions in October 2008 “due to reports of corruption and fraud in the adoption process.” Kyrgyz authorities are currently investigating these allegations

  • Kyrgyzstan Adoption Notice:In January 2011, The Department of State published the Annual Report on Intercountry Adoption to Congress.  We learned that one case was mistakenly reported as an adoption of a Kyrgyz orphan due to a transcription error made when the visa was issued.  We have confirmed there were no adoptions of children of Kyrgyz nationality by U.S. citizens in fiscal year 2010.  The Department regrets this error in its Annual Report and will continue to provide updates on intercountry adoption in Kyrgyzstan.
    U.S. Department of State February 25, 2011
  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with Kyrgyzstan adoption programs.
  • For more information, visit the Department of State’s Kyrgyzstan adoption information page.

The Kyrgyz government stopped processing all intercountry adoptions in October 2008 due to reports of corruption and fraud in the adoption process.  The Kyrgyz authorities are conducting a criminal investigation into these allegations.

At present, the Kyrgyz government is not processing any adoption cases, including at least 65 adoptions by American families that were already in progress when the halt was announced.  The Department of State (the Department) has urged the Kyrgyz government to complete its criminal investigation and resolve the pending cases so that eligible children can be placed in permanent homes.  Many families have been waiting for over a year to complete their adoptions, and many of the children have serious medical problems.  The Department has repeated this message to Kyrgyz officials in Washington and through U.S. Embassy Bishkek. Department officials raised the pending adoptions in a November 12 meeting with the Kyrgyz Ambassador to the United States, and with the Kyrgyz Foreign Minister during his visit to Washington on October 5.

The Department also raised the visibility of this issue, and addressed questions and concerns expressed by Kyrgyz officials and shared by some Kyrgyz citizens, through outreach programs.  A U.S. adoption expert visited the KyrgyzRepublic in June to share her knowledge with Kyrgyz officials, nongovernmental organizations, journalists, and others.  In May, the Department sponsored an adoption-themed study tour to the United States for three senior Kyrgyz officials.  During the trip, the Kyrgyz officials met with representatives of the families with pending cases as well as some Kyrgyz children who had been adopted by Americans.  In addition to these efforts, we have encouraged the Kyrgyz government to strengthen safeguards in the adoption process and eventually accede to the Hague Adoption Convention.

The Kyrgyz Parliament is considering a draft bill to reform the adoption process.  It is unclear, however, if or when legislation will be passed to allow the completion of the pending cases and the processing of new ones.  On November 13, the Kyrgyz Parliament held a closed hearing on intercountry adoption at which experts made presentations.  It is our understanding that after the hearing Parliament decided to extend the deadline for government agencies to continue research on the subject.  Parliament plans to hold another hearing on adoption by the end of February 2010.  We will continue to engage the Kyrgyz government on this issue and will provide updates on this site as new information becomes available.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


MEXICO

Status

Mexico is currently OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Mexico is a member of the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption, and all adoptions from Mexico are subject to Convention regulations, U.S. law governing adoptions, and the Mexican Central Authority (MCA).  Adopting from Mexico can be a long, involved process.  Prospective adoptive parents are required to live with the child in Mexico for a one- to three-week trial period.  Due to the amount of paperwork required, the State System for the Full Development of the Family (Desarrollo Integral de la Familia, or DIF) recommends that adoptive parents be prepared to spend at least three months in Mexico prior to the adoption finalization.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


MONTENEGRO

Status

Montenegro is currently CLOSED to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Coming Soon

  • Montenegro Adoption Notice:  The Hague Adoption Convention Enters Into Force for Montenegro
    U.S. Department of State July 3, 2012

    On July 1, 2012, the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-Operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption entered into force for Montenegro. However, Montenegro does not yet have a fully functional Convention process in place. Therefore, the United States has determined that it will not be able to process Convention intercountry adoptions until the Government of Montenegro implements an effective Convention intercountry adoption process.

    We caution service providers and prospective adoptive parents that, to ensure that adoptions from Montenegro will be compliant with the Convention, important steps must take place before intercountry adoptions between the United States and Montenegro resume. Adoption service providers should neither initiate nor claim to initiate adoption programs in Montenegro until the Department of State notifies them that it has resumed adoptions in Montenegro.

    The Department of State will provide updated information on adoption.state.gov as it becomes available. If you have any questions about this notice, please contact the Office of Children's Issues at 1-888-407-4747 within the United Staes, or 202-501-4444 from outside the United States. Email inquiries may be directed to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


NEPAL

Status

Nepal is currently OPEN to intercountry adoption in cases involving the relinquishment of children, but SUSPENDED in cases involving abandoned children. Please refer to the August 6, 2010 Nepal Adoption Notice below.

Summary

Nepal is not a party to the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption.  The Ministry of Women, Children and Social Welfare (WCS) in Nepal is responsible for overseeing adoptions, and adoption agencies must be approved by the WCS in order to work in Nepal. Note: According to a statement dated March 4, 2010, the U.S. Department of State “strongly discourages prospective adoptive parents from choosing Nepal as a country from which to adopt due to grave concerns about the reliability of Nepal’s adoption system and the accuracy of the information in children’s official files.  The Department also strongly discourages adoption service providers from accepting new applications for adoption from Nepal until reforms are made.”

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


NIGERIA

Status

Nigeria is currently OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Nigeria is not a member of the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption.  According to the U.S. Department of State, document and identify fraud in adoption is common in Nigeria.  The U.S. Consulate General usually conducts an investigation to verify all the information before an adoption is approved, but these investigations can often take many months.  Under Nigerian law, parents who are not of Nigerian heritage may not adopt from Nigeria, although this law is applied inconsistently.  A parent/child relationship must be established prior to the finalization of an adoption.  Adoption laws in Nigeria are complex and vary greatly from state to state.

  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with Nigerian adoption programs.
  • For more information, click here to visit the Department of State’s Nigerian adoption information page.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website



PERU

Status

Peru is currently OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Peru is party to the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption, and adoptions from Peru must meet the requirements of the Convention as well as the laws governing adoption in both Peru and the U.S.  All adoptions from Peru must go through Peru’s Central Authority, the Ministry for Women and Social Development (MIMDES), which only processes adoptions for children who have been determined to be legally abandoned wards of the state.

  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with Peru adoption programs.
  • For more information, click here to visit the Department of State’s Peru adoption information page.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


THE PHILIPPINES

Status

The Philippines is currently OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

The Philippines is party to the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption. As of May 1, 2009, the Inter-Country Adoption Board (ICAB) in The Philippines declared a moratorium on new applications from prospective adoptive parents seeking to adopt a child 0-2 years of age, until the ICAB processed at least 50% of current cases pending.

  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with adoption programs from The Philippines.
  • Click here for a list of U.S. adoption agencies approved to process adoptions in The Philippines.  Please note:  Not all agencies on this list are members of NCFA.
  • For more information, visit the Department of State’s Philippines adoption information page by clicking here.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


POLAND

Status

Poland is currently OPEN to intercountry adoption. 

Summary

Poland is a party to the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption. All adoptions from Poland to the United States must meet the requirements of both countries and fulfill all Hague Convention regulations.  Adoptions from Poland are subject to approval by the Polish adoption authority, the Public Adoptive-Guardian Center (Publiczny Osrodek Adopcyjno-Opiekunczy).  Adoptive parents must meet the child before the adoption is finalized, and are required to send post-adoption reports back to Poland.

  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with Polish adoption programs.
  • For more information, click here to visit the Department of State's Polish adoption information page.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website



 

ROMANIA

Status

Romania is currently paritally OPEN* to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Coming Soon

*Refer to the U.S. Department of State Adoption Notice 

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


RUSSIA

Status

Russia is currently CLOSED  to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Russia, which has long been among the top countries  of origin for American families adopting internationally, is not a member of the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption. A child must be considered eligible for adoption by the Russian government in order to be placed with an adoptive family, and American prospective adoptive parents must meet all requirements set by both U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and Russian adoption officials.


  • Russia Adoption Notice: Federation Council approves Legislation to Ban Intercountry Adoption by U.S. Families
    U.S. Department of State December 26, 2012

    The Department of State continues to follow developments in Russia related to Federal Law No. 186614-6 and remains actively engaged in discussions with the Russian government regarding concerns that, if signed into law, this legislation will needlessly remove the opportunity for hundreds of Russian orphans to join loving families each year.  The Federation Council (the upper house of the Russian Parliament) approved the legislation in a unanimous vote on December 26 and it will now go to President Vladimir Putin for signature or veto.  The Department of State has not received any notice that adoptions to the United States are suspended, and both the Department of State and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services continue to work closely with Russian authorities on intercountry adoption issues as set forth in the U.S.-Russia adoption agreement.

    U.S. families currently in the process of adopting a child from Russia are encouraged to reach out to the Department of State at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it to provide information regarding where they are in the adoption process.  We encourage families to use the subject line “Intercountry adoption in Russia – family update.”  We will seek to provide information directly to families that contact our office through email as it becomes available.  Information regarding the passage of any legislation that affects U.S. citizens who are in the process of adopting a child from Russia will also be posted on adoption.state.gov.
  • Russia Adoption Notice: Legislation to Ban Intercountry Adoption by U.S. Families Passes the Russian Duma and Moves to the Federation Council for Review
    U.S. Department of State December 21, 2012

    The Department of State continues to follow developments in Russia’s legislature related to Federal Law No 186614-6 and remains actively engaged with the Russian government.  We are concerned by measures in the bill, approved by the Russian Duma with overwhelming support today, that ban the adoption of Russian children by U.S. families.  In order for this legislation to become law it requires approval by the Federation Council (the upper house of the Russian Parliament), and the signature of President Vladimir Putin.  The Department has expressed concern to the Russian government that, if signed into law, this legislation will needlessly remove the path to families for hundreds of Russian children each year.  To view the public statements by Ambassador Michael McFaul and the Department of State’s Spokesman on Federal Law No 186614-6, please visit the U.S. Embassy in Moscow’s website at: http://moscow.usembassy.gov/ and www.state.gov.

    The Department of State has not received any notice that adoptions to the United States are suspended, and both the Department of State and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services continue to work closely with Russian authorities on intercountry adoption issues as set forth in the U.S.-Russia adoption agreement.  The United States is committed to upholding the provisions of the agreement negotiated between the U.S. and Russian governments, to strengthen procedural safeguards in the adoption process.

    Information regarding the passage of any legislation that affects U.S. citizens who are in the process of adopting a child from Russia will be posted on www.adoption.state.gov as it becomes available.
  • Russia Alert Notice: Entry into Force of the U.S.-Russia Adoption Agreement
    U.S. Department of State November 1, 2012

    The Agreement between the United States of America and the Russian Federation Regarding Cooperation in Adoption of Children (the Agreement) entered into force on November 1, 2012, following the exchange of diplomatic notes between the U.S. and Russian governments.

    The Agreement will provide additional safeguards to better protect the welfare and interests of children and all parties involved in intercountry adoptions.  To find out more about the agreement, please visit the Department of State's FAQs.

    Click here to view the Text of Agreement
    Click here to view the FAQ: Bilateral Adoption Agreement with Russia
  • Russia Adoption Notice: Department of State and Russian Authorities issue joint statement on Adoption Agreement's entry into force
    U.S. Department of State October 15, 2012

    A joint Department of State and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services team traveled to Moscow September 26 – 28 to meet with Russian officials to discuss implementing procedures for the Agreement between the United States of America and the Russian Federation Regarding Cooperation in Adoption of Children (the Agreement).  We expect to bring the Agreement into force on November 1, 2012.

    A copy of the teams’ joint statement regarding these discussions and the Agreement’s entry into force date is available on the U.S. Embassy’s website.

    Cilck here to view the Text of Agreement
    Click here to view the FAQ: BilateralAdoption Agreement with Russia
  • Russia Adoption Notice: Federation Council approves the Agreement between the United States of America and the Russian Federation Regarding Cooperation in Adoption of Children
    U.S. Department of State July 20, 2012

    On July 18, 2012, the Federation Council, the upper house of the Russian Parliment, approved the bilateral adoption agreement signed by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov on July 13, 2011. This followed the Russian Duma's approval of the Agreement on July 10, 2012. Both of these actions mark a significant milestone toward the entry into force of the Agreement, which will provide additional safeguards to better protect the welfare and interests of children and all parties involved in intercountry adoptions. To find out more about the agreement, please visit the U.S. Department of State's FAQs and the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) FAQs on the agreement and its implementation.

    The Agreement will now be sent to President Putin. Following President Putin's signature, the parties will need to establish procedures to implement the Agreement, which we are committed to doing as expeditiously as possible. Following the establishment of these procedures, the Agreement will enter into force upon exchange of notes between the U.S. and Russian governments. The Department of State and USCIS will provide guidance on their websites related to the Agreement. Please monitor adoption.state.gov and uscis.gov for more information.
  • Russia Adoption Notice: President Putin signs the Agreement between the United States of America and the Russian Federation Regarding Cooperation in Adoption of Children
    U.S. Department of State July 31, 2012

    On July 28, 2012, President Putin signed into law the bilateral adoption agreement.  The Agreement, which was signed in 2011 by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, aims to improve the intercountry adoption process and better protect adoptive children, birth parents, and adoptive parents.  The Russian Duma approved the Agreement on July 10, 2012, and the Federation Council, the upper house of the Russian Parliament, approved the Agreement on July 18, 2012.

    The United States and Russia will now work as expeditiously as possible to establish procedures to implement the Agreement.  Following the establishment of these procedures, the Agreement will enter into force upon the exchange of diplomatic notes from the U.S. and Russian governments.  The exchange of notes will take place only after both sides have completed internal procedures necessary for entry into force.

    The Agreement will provide additional safeguards to better protect the welfare and interests of children and all parties involved in intercountry adoptions.  To find out more about the agreement, please visit the Department of State's FAQs and the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) FAQs on the agreement and its implementation.  Please also monitor adoption.state.gov and uscis.gov for updated information as it becomes available.
  • Russia Adoption Notice: Approval of the Agreement between the United States of America and the Russian Federation Regarding Cooperation in Adoption of Children
    U.S. Department of State July 10, 2012

    On July 10, 2012 the Russian Duma approved the bilateral adoption agreement signed by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov on July 13, 2011. This marks a significant milestone toward the entry into force of the Agreement, which will provide additional safeguards to better protect the welfare and interests of children and all parties involved in intercountry adoptions. To find out more about the agreement, please visit the U.S. Department of State's FAQs and the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) FAQs on the Agreement and its implementation.

    The Agreement will now go to the Federation Council, the upper house of the Russian Parliament, and once approved, will be sent to President Putin. Following President Putin's signature, the parties will need to establish procedures to implement the Agreement, which we are committed to doing as expeditiously as possible. Following the establishment of these procedures, the Agreement will enter into force upon th eexchange of notes between the U.S. and Russian governments. The Department of State and USCIS will provide guidance on their websites related to the Agreement. Please monitor adoption.state.gov and uscis.gov for more information.
  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with Russian adoption programs.
  • For more information, click here to visit the Department of State's Russia information page.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


RWANDA

Status

Rwanda is currently CLOSED to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Coming Soon


  • Rwanda Adoption Notice:  The Hague Adoption Convention Enters Into Force for Rwanda
    U.S. Department of State July 3, 2012

    On July 1, 2012, the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-Operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Convention) entered into force for Rwanda. However, the Government of Rwanda has notified the U.S. Embassy in Kigali that the current suspension on intercountry adoptions will remain in effect until the country has a fully fuctional Convention process. The Government of Rwanda believes the implementation will take several months.

    We caution service providers and prospective adoptive parents that important steps must take place before intercountry adoptions between the United States and Rwanda resume. Adoption service providers should neither initiate nor claim to initiate adoption programs in Rwanda until the Department of State notifies them that the Government of Rwanda has lifted its suspension on intercountry adoptions and that Rwanda's procedures meet the requirements of the Convention.

    The Department of State will provide updated information on adoption.state.gov as it becomes available. If you have any questions about this notice, please contact the Office of Children's Issues at 1-888-407-4747 within the United Staes, or 202-501-4444 from outside the United States. Email inquiries may be directed to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . .

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


SERBIA

Status

Serbia is currently OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Serbia is currently open to intercountry adoption; Serbia is not a party to the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption.  To bring an adopted child to the United States from Serbia, you must meet eligibility and suitability requirements of both the Government of Serbia and U.S. Immigration Policy. The Serbian Adoption authority is the Ministry of Labor, Employment and Social Policy.  There are no adoption agencies in Serbia, and there is no specific application process for intercountry adoption in Serbia. 

  • Alert: Serbia Adoption Reports of Misleading Guidance on Intercountry Adoptions from Serbia 
    U.S. Department of State May 13, 2013

    The U.S. Embassy in Belgrade has received reports that one or more U.S. adoption service providers may be providing prospective adoptive parents misleading information about the Serbian adoption process. Specifically, there may be misleading information as to who is authorized to provide adoption services and which children are eligible for intercountry adoption.   

    Serbia places a priority on domestic adoption. Generally, only children with special needs are available for intercountry adop­tion.  Adoption services in Serbia can be completed either through direct contact with the Ministry or with the assistance of an author­ized U.S. adoption service provider. A small number of U.S. adoption service providers are authorized by the Serbian Ministry of Labor, Employment, and Social Policy to provide services related to intercountry adoptions in Serbia. Prospective adoptive parents who decide to use an adoption service provider may wish to verify the agency’s authorization by contacting the Ministry at socijalna_zastit at minrzs.gov.rs or by calling +381 11 3631448. 

    The Department strong encourages prospective adoptive parents to read the procedures for completing an intercountry adoption from Serbia on the Department's Serbia adoption information page. There is no legal alternative to the Serbian adoption process. Prospective adoptive parents who received contradictory or misleading information from a U.S. accredited or approved adoption service provider are encouraged to register a complaint about the provider online through the Hague Complaint Registry

    Prospective adoptive parents are also encouraged to report such activity by an adoption service provider that is not accredited or approved to the licensing authority of the state where the agecy is located. A record of the complaint may also be submitted to the Office of Children's Issues via email to  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


SOUTH AFRICA

Status

South Africa is currently OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Coming Soon

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


SOUTH KOREA

Status

South Africa is currently OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Coming Soon

  • Adoption Notice: The Republic of Korea Signs the Hague Adoption Convention
    U.S. Department of State May 28, 2013

    On May 24, 2013, the Republic of Korea (South Korea) signed the Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (the Convention).  This is the first step for South Korea in becoming a Convention partner.  Adoptions between the United States and South Korea, however, are not yet subject to the require­ments of the Convention and relevant implementing laws and regulations.  According to the Ministry of Health and Wel­fare, which will be designated as South Korea’s Central Authority, there is no set date when South Korea will deliver its instrument of ratification or when the Convention will enter into force with respect to South Korea.  We will continue to keep you informed through adoption.state.gov as we receive additional updates.

    Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website


Back to Top


TAIWAN

Status

Taiwan is currenlty OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Taiwan is not party to the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption.  All adoptions from Taiwan are processed through the Children's Bureau (Er Tong Ju), Ministry of Interior, and must meet the requirements of both Taiwanese and American adoption authorities.  Taiwan requires post-placement reports for five years following the finalization of the adoption.

  • Taiwan Adoption Notice
    U.S. Department of State February 28, 2013

    The Department of State shares the follow web alert posted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services on February 26, 2013.

    Taiwan implements a Pre-Adoption Immigration Review requirements for all adoptions by U.S. citizens of children residing in Taiwan

    In January, the Taiwan Child Welfare Bureau issued an administrative order that requires all adoption cases filed on behalf of U.S. prospective adoptive parents with the Taiwan courts to undergo the U.S. PAIR process. The order applies to all currently licensed Taiwan adoption service providers (ASP), and any ASPs which may be licensed in the future. The administrative order instructs Taiwan ASPs to include a letter issued by the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) located in Taipei, confirming that USCIS successfully completed the PAIR process with each court filing initiated after April 1, 2013. The new requirement will not affect pending adoption cases filed with Taiwan courts before April 1, 2013.

    To enable prospective parents adopting from Taiwan to comply with Taiwan's new requirement, USCIS issued a policy memorandum, effective immediately, that allows prospective adoptive parents to file a Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative, before Taiwan courts finalized an adoption in Taiwan. These new procedures allow USCIS to assess the eligibility for U.S. immigration benefits and make a preliminary determination before Taiwan courts finalize the adoption decree. A copy of the policy memorandum is available at uscis.gov.

    After USCIS issues a preliminary determination of the child's immigration eligibility, AIT will issue a letter to prospective adoptive parents confirming completing of the PAIR process. Prospective adoptive parents, through the ASPs, must include the letter from AIT when filing a case with the Taiwan courts. To begin the PAIR process, petitioners adopting children from Taiwan should file the Form I-600 petition and supporting documents with the USCIS National Benefits Center (NBC) before filing an adoption case with the Taiwan courts. Please refer to the Form I-600 instructions for the NBC. USCIS overseas offices and the AIT will continue to accept Form I-600 petitions, but such petitions will be forwarded to the NBC for PAIR review.

    Prospective adoptive parents filing their Form I-600 petition should include all available required documentation when filing a Form I-600 petition, except the adoption decree or grant of legal custody. In addition, the following PAIR-specific documentation must be submitted when the child's country of origin is Taiwan:

    Evidence of availability for intercountry adoption generated by the Taiwan island-wide database; Signed adoption agreement between birth parents and prospective parents for use in Taiwan District Family Courts; and Power of attorney appointing the Taiwan ASP to represent the prospective adoptive parents.

    The Taiwan District Family Court will make its own determination regarding the child's adoptability. After completing the adoption and receiving the adoption decree from Taiwan District Family Court, U.S. adoptive parents will submit their adoption decree and all necessary documents to AIT for final FormI-600 petition approval and immigrant visa processing.

    You may refer to adoption.state.gov for additional information about adopting from Taiwan.
  • Taiwan Adoption Notice: United States and Taiwan to Discuss Implementation of a Pre-Adoption Immigration Review (PAIR) Process
    U.S. Department of State October 25, 2012

    From September 17-24, 2012, a joint Department of State and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) technical team traveled to Taiwan to discuss the intercountry adoption process between Taiwan and the United States. The team met with the Taiwan authorities regarding the possibility of implementing a Pre-Adoption Immigration Review (PAIR) process. This process would provide Taiwan courts with information regarding the child's likely eligibility to immigrate to the United States before the court enters an order establishing a permanent legal relationship between the U.S. citizen parents and child. Taiwan authorities indicated a desire to implement the PAIR process in Taiwan soon.

    The PAIR process would provide systematic safeguards for prospective adoptive children and parents. Under PAIR, USCIS reviews a child's eligibility to immigrate to the United States before a final adoption order or custody order transfers rights to adopting U.S. parents. Such a review can prevent situations in which U.S. families cannot bring their adopted child to the United States. Additionally, the PAIR process will minimize the possibility of long separations from the child after the adoption or custody decree is issued while waiting for the U.S. authorities to review the child's immigration eligibility. However, per U.S. law, the definitive finding of the child's immigration eligibility would still be made at the time of the adjudication.

    To implement PAIR, Taiwan authorities intend to require all licensed adoption service providers operating in Taiwan to submit evidence to the Taiwan courts in each adoption case that USCIS has conducted a PAIR review.

    If Taiwan authoritIes make this procedural change, USCIS will implement a process to allow prospective adoptive parents to obtain a PAIR determination before submitting adoption cases to the appropriate court in Taiwan. Specially, the PAIR process would allow prospective adoptive parents adopting from Taiwan to file their Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative, with all supporting documentation except the final adoption decree, with USCIS before filing their case with the courts in Taiwan. After reviewing the child's immigration eligibility, USCIS would issue a preliminary determination to prospective adoptive parents of the child's immigration eligibility.

    USCIS and the State Department will continue to update the public of any new developments on PAIR processing in Taiwan.
  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with Taiwanese adoption programs.
  • For more information, click here to visit the Department of State's Taiwan adoption information page.
Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

THAILAND

Status

Thailand is currenlty OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Thailand is a member of the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption.  According to a statement from the U.S. Department of State in April 2010, Thailand’s central adoption authority, the Department of Social Development and Welfare (DSDW), is no longer processing new adoption requests for “healthy orphans.” The adoptions of older children, sibling groups, or children with special needs will continue to be processed.

  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with adoption programs in Thailand.
  • For more information, click here to visit the Department of State's Thailand adoption information page.
Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website


UGANDA

Status

Uganda is currently OPEN to intercountry adoption. 

Summary

Uganda is not a member of the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption.  All adoptions from Uganda must meet both Ugandan and U.S. requirements.  NOTE: The Ugandan Children’s Act requires foreign adoptive parents to reside in Uganda and foster parent the child for at least three years, although High Court judges do occasionally waive this requirement.  Once the adoption has been approved, finalization may take 4-6 weeks or longer, depending on the courts.  Adoptive parents must register the adoption at the office of the Registrar General in Kampala.

  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with Ugandan adoption programs.
  • For more information, click here to visit the Department of State's Uganda adoption information page.
Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

UKRAINE

Status

Ukraine is currenlty OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Ukraine is not a member of the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption.  All adoptions from Ukraine to the United States are subject to both U.S. and Ukrainian law.  Completed adoption dossiers must be filed with Ukrainian State Department for Adoptions and Protection of the Rights of the Child (SDAPRC), which issues referrals for children eligible for intercountry adoption.  According to data published by the SDAPRC, most of the children available for adoption in Ukraine are either over the age of three, part of a sibling group, or infants and children who may have serious health problems and/or special needs.

  • Ukraine Adoption Alert:  Presidential order expected to allow SDA to continue processing adoptions in Ukraine, U.S. Department of State, July 12, 2011:  On July 8, 2011, the president of Ukraine signed an order which extends the State Department on Adoption's (SDA's) authority to process adoptions.  We have been informed by the SDA that the order will not take effect until the order is published, likely within a few days.  The SDA currently is not accpeting adoption applications.  According to the order, the SDA will have the authority to continue processing adotpions until the Ministry of Social Policy is ready to take over as the new adoption authority in Ukraine.  The Ministry does not yet know when they will be prepared to take over adoption processing. 

    We will continue to ask the Ukraine governement to resume adoptions as quickly as possible.  We will also continue to encourage the Ministry of Social Policy to protect adoptions where U.S. prospective adoptive parents have already been approved by the SDA to adopt a particular child. 

    According to the SDA, there are approximately 139 U.S. families registered with the SDA, some of them already in-country.  We will be following new developments closely to understand how they will affect the families currently in process and will be posting relevant updates.  In that respect, we recommend that all American families that are currently in Ukraine or have appointments with SDA during the next few weeks send their contact information to the U.S. Embassy in Ukraine's Adoption Unit at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .  Families should contact their local adoption service provider for further updates and details.

    Updated information will be provided on adoption.state.gov as it becomes available.  
  • Ukraine Adoption Notice:  SDA Authority and Adoption Processing in Ukraine
    U.S. Department of State April 29, 2011
  • Ukraine Adoption Notice
    U.S. Department of State April 8, 2011
  • Ukraine Adoption Notice from the U.S. Department of State, December 14, 2010:  U.S. Embassy Kyiv has learned the moratorium bill has been removed from this session's agenda and rescheduled for the session taking place December 21-24.  
  • Ukraine Adoption Notice from the U.S. Department of State, December 9, 2010: On November 3, 2010, a proposed bill that would place a moratorium on intercountry adoptions from countries without bilateral agreements, including the United States passed a first reading in the Ukrainian parliament.  On December 7, the U.S. Embassy in Kyiv learned the proposed moratorium bill has been scheduled for a second reading during the upcoming plenary session on December 16.  As the plenary session does have several important agenda items, this schedule may be subject to change depend­ing on the progress of each issue .

    Additionally, the U.S. Embassy in Kyiv was informed that a slight, but possibly important, change was made to the text for the second reading.  The bill originally stated, “intercountry adoptions will not be allowed for the citizens and permanent residents of the countries with which Ukraine does not have bilateral adoption agreements.”  The change eliminates the word “bilateral,” which may allow the possibility of multilateral agreements, like the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption, to take the place of bilateral agreements.

    The Ukrainian State Department for Adoptions (SDA) has indicated that adoption processing will be conducted as usual until mandated by a change in legislation.

    The Department of State cannot predict the outcome of the second reading. However, the U.S. Embassy in Kyiv is active in encouraging its counterparts to consider Hague Adoption Convention as the best means to address concerns in the adoption process and to safeguard cases in progress.  The Embassy is monitoring the situation closely.  Any prospective adoptive parents with cases currently open in Ukraine are encouraged to contact the This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .  The Embassy maintains a listserv to communicate with U.S. citizen prospective adoptive parents and will use this to send updates as information is available.
  • Ukraine Adoption Notice from the U.S. Department of State, November 3, 2010:  The Ukrainian legislature is in the process of voting on a bill that would suspend all intercountry adoptions from countries without bilateral agreements with Ukraine, including adoptions from the United States.  The bill passed a first reading and vote, but must still pass a second reading and be signed into law by the president.  The second reading could take place in the next few weeks.  If the bill passes the second reading, it may be signed into law as early as the end of 2010.  The draft bill appears to include suspension of all adoptions in progress.  The U.S. Department of State will post updates as information becomes available. 

  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with Ukrainian adoption programs.
  • For more information, click here to visit the Department of State's Ukraine adoption information page.
Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website

Back to Top


Uzbekistan

Status

Uzbekistan is currenlty OPEN to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Uzbekistan is not a member of the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption and all adoptions processed there must be in accordance with 8 Code of Federal Regulations, Seciton 204.3.  Due to changes implemented by the government of Uzbekistan, the judicial system is required to implement specified procedural steps when reviewing adoption cases.  Adoptive parents can expect delays during this time. 

Prospective adoptive parents must meet eligibility and suitability requirements in order to bring an adopted child to the U.S.  They must also be at least 15 years older than the child (except in cases where the child is being adopted by a step-parent) and must appear in person in the beginning and at the final stage of the adoption process.

The child must also meet the definition of orphan as described in the U.S. immigration law.  Uzbekistan requires that the child must be under 16 years old by the time the adoption is completed.  As a general rule, siblings must be adopted by one adoptive family, except under special circumstances.  In the case of abandonment, one year must pass from the date the child was found abandoned before he is eligible for adoption.  There are no special requirements for children with special needs or medical conditions.

  • Uzbekistan Adoption Notice from the U.S. Department of State July 24, 2013: In May 2013, the Government of Uzbekistan issued a decree amending the Civil Procedural Code concerning Courts appointed as adoption authorities to review domestic and intercountry adoptions.  The changes will require the judicial system of Uzbekistan to implement certain procedural steps for reviewing adoption cases.  Because the details of these changes will not be known until the Cabinet of Ministers releases final procedural orders, prospective adoptive parents may face unexpected delays during the implementation of the new process.  

    Updated information about the new procedures will be added as soon as it becomes available.
Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website 

Back to Top



VIETNAM

Status

Vietnam is currenlty CLOSED to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Vietnam is not a member of the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption.  The 2005 Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) on intercountry adoption between the U.S. and Vietnam expired in September 2008, and a new agreement has yet to be established.  Most of the adoptions in process prior to the expiration of the 2005 MOA have been completed, but no new adoption requests are being accepted.  Government and adoption officials from both Vietnam and the U.S. continue to meet to discuss intercountry adoption, but Vietnam requires substantial reforms before it can reopen its foreign adoption programs.

  • Vietnam Adoption Notice: Children Adopted From Vietnam Before July 1, 2009 must Register with the Government of Vietnam to Retain Vietnamese Citizenship.
    U.S. Department of State, October 25, 2013

    The 2008 citizenship law of Vietnam requires that children adopted from Vietnam before July 1, 2009 must register with overseas Vietnamese diplomatic missions prior to July 1, 2014 to retain their Vietnamese citizenship (Art. 13.2 citizenship law of Vietnam). The law does not require children adopted from Vietnam after July 1, 2009 to register because they automatically retain their Vietnamese citizenship (Art. 37.1 citizenship law of Vietnam).

    After July 1, 2014, those who do not register for retention will lose their Vietnamese citizenship. In order to reclaim their Vietnamese nationality, they would have to apply for restoration of Vietnamese citizenship, proving that they meet the conditions of Article 23 of the citizenship law of Vietnam and following a rigorous process that requires the approval of the President of Vietnam.

    For instructions on how to apply to retain Vietnamese citizenship, please visit the website of the Embassy of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam.
  • Vietnam Adoption Notice:  Intercountry Adoption is Not Possible from Vietnam at This Time
     U.S. Department of State June 15,2011
  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with adoption programs in Vietnam.
  • For more information, click here to visit the Department of State's Vietnam adoption information page.
Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website
 

GUATEMALA

Status

Guatemala is currently closed to intercountry adoption.

Summary

Guatelmala is a member of the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption, but has thus far failed to comply with the Convention's regulations.  There is no indication if or when Guatemala will be able to establish a Hague-compliant intercountry adoption program.  At this time, both the U.S. Department of State and adoption advocacy organizations in the U.S. strongly discourage prospective adoptive parents from pursuing intercountry adoption fron Guatemala.

  • Click here for a list of NCFA Member Agencies with Guatemala adoption programs.
  • For more information, click here to visit the Department of State's Guatemala adoption information page.

Source: U.S. Department of State Intercountry Adoption website


Back to Top

More on Intercountry Adoption

 

Join our Community

Facebook     Twitter  icon-blog  

Your Support Makes NCFA's Mission Possible

For 33 years, NCFA has been the authoritative voice for adoption. Our research and education programs have led the way in promoting sound, ethical adoption policies and practices that have enabled children to find nurturing, permanent families through adoption.

Join our Mailing List

JOIN HERE

2013 National Adoption Conference Platinum Sponsor


BCS_Logo_RGB_WEB

2014 Partner for Adoption


Americas Christian Credit Union Web

America's Christian Credit Union (ACCU) believes every child deserves a forever family. Their adoption loan program has helped place over 1,000 children in loving homes. In addition to adoption loans, ACCU provides effective banking solutions to individuals and ministries that empower them to reach their financial goals while expanding God's Kingdom. Click here to read more >>